The Routledge Handbook of People and Place in the 21st-Century City

The Routledge Handbook of People and Place in the 21st-Century City

PDF The Routledge Handbook of People and Place in the 21st-Century City Download

  • Author: Kate Bishop
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1351211528
  • Category : Architecture
  • Languages : en
  • Pages : 316

Increasing urbanization and increasing urban density put enormous pressure on the relationships between people and place in cities. Built environment professionals must pay attention to the impact of people–place relationships in small- to large-scale urban initiatives. A small playground in a neighborhood pocket park is an example of a small-scale urban development; a national environmental policy that influences energy sources is an example of a large-scale initiative. All scales of decision-making have implications for the people–place relationships present in cities. This book presents new research in contemporary, interdisciplinary urban challenges, and opportunities, and aims to keep the people–place relationship debate in focus in the policies and practices of built environment professionals and city managers. Most urban planning and design decisions, even those on a small scale, will remain in the urban built form for many decades, conditioning people’s experience of their city. It is important that these decisions are made using the best available knowledge. This book contains an interdisciplinary discussion of contemporary urban movements and issues influencing the relationship between people and place in urban environments around the world which have major implications for both the processes and products of urban planning, design, and management. The main purpose of the book is to consolidate contemporary thinking among experts from a range of disciplines including anthropology, environmental psychology, cultural geography, urban design and planning, architecture and landscape architecture, and the arts, on how to conceptualize and promote healthy people and place relationships in the 21st-century city. Within each of the chapters, the authors focus on their specific areas of expertise which enable readers to understand key issues for urban environments, urban populations, and the links between them.


Routledge Handbook of Urban Landscape Research

Routledge Handbook of Urban Landscape Research

PDF Routledge Handbook of Urban Landscape Research Download

  • Author: Kate Bishop
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • ISBN: 1000811417
  • Category : Architecture
  • Languages : en
  • Pages : 576

Landscape architecture is one of the key professions dedicated to making cities hospitable and healthy places to live, work and play, while respecting and enhancing the natural environments and landscapes we inhabit. This edited collection presents current writing about the pivotal roles that landscape architects play in addressing some of the most pressing problems facing the planet, its environments and its populations through their research, analysis and speculative practice. The book has assembled current writings on recent research structured around five major themes: governance, power and partnership; infrastructure, systems and performance; environment, resilience and climate change; people, place and design; and culture, heritage and identity. As a collection, the chapters demonstrate the diversity of themes and topics that are expanding the scholarly body of knowledge for the discipline and its relevance to the practice of landscape architecture. The contributors to this book are academic researchers and practitioners from the discipline of landscape architecture. The chapters draw on their research, teaching and experience as well as analysis of project examples. Fifty-two contributors from the United Stsates, United Kingdom, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Malaysia, Spain, Colombia, Australia, New Zealand and Canada discuss a diverse range of contemporary themes in urban landscape architecture. Collectively, the contributors demonstrate the breadth of experience, shared concerns and distinct issues that challenge urban landscape architecture and cities in the 21st century.


Place Attachment

Place Attachment

PDF Place Attachment Download

  • Author: Lynne C. Manzo
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1000257967
  • Category : Architecture
  • Languages : en
  • Pages : 268

Following on from the ground-breaking first edition, which received the 2014 EDRA Achievement Award, this fully updated text includes new chapters on current issues in the built environment, such as GIS and mapping, climate change, and qualitative approaches. Place attachments are powerful emotional bonds that form between people and their physical surroundings. They inform our sense of identity, create meaning in our lives, facilitate community, and influence action. Place attachments have bearing on such diverse issues as rootedness and belonging, placemaking and displacement, mobility and migration, intergroup conflict, civic engagement, social housing and urban redevelopment, natural resource management, and global climate change. In this multidisciplinary book, Manzo and Devine-Wright draw together the latest thinking by leading scholars from around the globe, including contributions from scholars such as Daniel Williams, Mindy Fullilove, Randy Hester, and David Seamon, to capture significant advancements in three main areas: theory, methods, and applications. Over the course of fifteen chapters, using a wide range of conceptual and applied methods, the authors critically review and challenge contemporary knowledge, identify significant advances, and point to areas for future research. This important volume offers the most current understandings about place attachment, a critical concept for the environmental social sciences and placemaking professions.


Why Public Space Matters

Why Public Space Matters

PDF Why Public Space Matters Download

  • Author:
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 0197543731
  • Category :
  • Languages : en
  • Pages : 337

Drawing from decades of research, Setha Low shows how public space contributes to a flourishing society through promoting social justice and democratic practices. Thriving public spaces also enhance creativity, health, urban resilience, and environmental sustainability. Yet more than ever, public spaces across the world are threatened by urban development, privatization and neglect. Public spaces -- where people from all walks of life play, work, meet, talk, read, think, debate, and protest -- are vital to a healthy civic life. And, as the eminent scholar of public space Setha Low argues in Why Public Space Matters, even fleeting moments of visibility and encounter in these spaces tend to foster a broader worldview and our willingness to accept difference. Such experiences also enhance flexible thinking, problem solving, creativity, and inclusiveness. There are many such spaces, but they all enhance social life. Sidewalks and plazas offer business opportunities for small-scale entrepreneurs who cannot afford store space. Public parks have long provided major cultural attractions, from plays to concerts, at little or no cost to the public. Central squares have a storied tradition as arenas for demonstrations and political protests. Parks and waterways create sustainable greenways, and during disasters, all manner of public spaces become centers for food delivery and shelter. To illustrate their value, Low draws from decades of research in public spaces across the Americas, from New York to Costa Rica. Yet we are losing public spaces to accelerated urban development and the belief that public spaces are expendable. Just as important is the broad-scale and ongoing privatization of public space by corporate actors. Low explores why public spaces matter today, how they are at risk, and what we can do about protecting these essential places that support our everyday lives. Finally, she shows how we can work to promote public space protection and expansion at both the grassroots and global levels. Throughout, she focuses on real public spaces and the people who use them in cities and regions across the Americas, from New Jersey to Costa Rica. A powerful, defining statement on a foundational contributor to healthy civic life, Low's book not only details what we are at risk of losing, but shows us how we can not only stop the losses, but work to expand the number of spaces available to the public.


The Narrative Turn in Urban Planning

The Narrative Turn in Urban Planning

PDF The Narrative Turn in Urban Planning Download

  • Author: Lieven Ameel
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1000221571
  • Category : Architecture
  • Languages : en
  • Pages : 154

Narratives, in the context of urban planning, matter profoundly. Planning theory and practice have taken an increasing interest in the role and power of narrative, and yet there is no comprehensive study of how narrative, and concepts from narrative and literary theory more broadly, can enrich planning and policy. The Narrative Turn in Urban Planning addresses this gap by defining key concepts such as story, narrative, and plot against a planning backdrop, and by drawing up a functional typology of different planning narratives. In two extended case studies from the planning of the Helsinki waterfront, it applies the narrative concepts and theories to a broad range of texts and practices, considering ways toward a more conscious and contextualized future urban planning. Questioning what is meant when we speak of narratives in urban planning, and what typologies we can draw up, it presents a threefold taxonomy of narratives within a planning framework. This book will serve as an important reference text for upper-level students and researchers interested in urban planning.


The Social Construction of Landscapes in Games

The Social Construction of Landscapes in Games

PDF The Social Construction of Landscapes in Games Download

  • Author: Dennis Edler
  • Publisher: Springer Nature
  • ISBN: 3658354038
  • Category : Social Science
  • Languages : en
  • Pages : 450

The book is dedicated to a compilation of diverse and creative landscapes which occur in games. Being part of a game setting, these landscapes trigger social construction processes in specific ways. A selection of twenty-four research articles addresses the social constructions of landscapes represented in analogue, digital and hybrid game formats as well as their theoretical framing and future perspectives.


Places, Spaces, and Voids in the Holocaust

Places, Spaces, and Voids in the Holocaust

PDF Places, Spaces, and Voids in the Holocaust Download

  • Author: Natalia Aleksiun
  • Publisher: Wallstein Verlag
  • ISBN: 3835346792
  • Category : History
  • Languages : en
  • Pages : 344

The EHS issues are thematic. Each issue features a selection of peer-reviewed research articles, which offer novel perspectives on the main theme. Includes: - Andrea Löw and Kim Wünschman: Film and the Reordering of City Space in Nazi Germany: The Demolition of the Munich Main Synagogue - Michal Frankl: Cast out of Civilized Society. Refugees in the No Man`s Land between Slovakia and Hungary in 1938 - Beate Meyer: Foreign Jews in Nazi Germany - Protected or Persecuted? Preliminary Results of a New Study - Dominique Schröder: Writing the Camps, Shifting the Limits of Language: Toward a Semantics of the Concentration Camps? - Tal Bruttmann, Stefan Hördler, and Christoph Kreutzmüller: A Paradoxical Panorama: Aspects of Space in Lili Jacob's Album - Irina Rebrova: Jewish Accounts of Soviet Evacuation to the North Caucasus - Malena Chinski: A New Address for Holocaust Research: Michel Borwicz and Joseph Wulf in Paris, 1947–1951 - Anna Engelking: "Our own traitor" as the Focal Point of Belarusian Folk Narrative on Local Perpetrators of the Holocaust - Hannah Wilson: The Memoryscape of Sobibór Death Camp: Commemoration and Materiality Der Band erscheint vollständig in englischer Sprache.


The Routledge Handbook of Designing Public Spaces for Young People

The Routledge Handbook of Designing Public Spaces for Young People

PDF The Routledge Handbook of Designing Public Spaces for Young People Download

  • Author: Janet Loebach
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 0429012810
  • Category : Architecture
  • Languages : en
  • Pages : 416

The Routledge Handbook of Designing Public Spaces for Young People is a thorough and practical resource for all who wish to influence policy and design decisions in order to increase young people’s access to and use of public spaces, as well as their role in design and decision-making processes. The ability of youth to freely enjoy public spaces, and to develop a sense of belonging and attachment to these environments, is critical for their physical, social, cognitive, and emotional development. Young people represent a vital citizen group with legitimate rights to occupy and shape their public environments, yet they are often driven out of public places by adult users, restrictive bylaws, or hostile designs. It is also important that children and youth have the opportunity to genuinely participate in the planning of public spaces, and to have their needs considered in the design of the public realm. This book provides both evidence and tools to help effectively advocate for more youth-inclusive public environments, as well as integrate youth directly into both research and design processes related to the public realm. It is essential reading for researchers, design and planning professionals, community leaders, and youth advocates.


Remaking Culture and Music Spaces

Remaking Culture and Music Spaces

PDF Remaking Culture and Music Spaces Download

  • Author: Ian Woodward
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • ISBN: 1000783790
  • Category : Social Science
  • Languages : en
  • Pages : 283

This collection analyses the remaking of culture and music spaces during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Its central focus is how cultural producers negotiated radically disrupted and uncertain conditions by creating, designing, and curating new objects and events, and through making alternative combinations of practices and spaces. By examining contexts and practices of remaking culture and music, it goes beyond being a chronicle of how the pandemic disrupted cultural life and livelihoods. The book also raises crucial questions about the forms and dynamics of post-pandemic spaces of culture and music. Main themes include the affective and embodied dimensions that shape the experience, organisation, and representation of cultural and musical activity; the restructuring of industries and practices of work and cultural production; the transformation of spaces of cultural expression and community; and the uncertainty and resilience of future culture and music. This collection will be instrumental for researchers, practitioners, and students studying the spatial, material, and affective dimensions of cultural production in the fields of cultural sociology, cultural and creative industries research, festival and event studies, and music studies. Its interdisciplinary nature makes it beneficial reading for anyone interested in what has happened to culture and music during the global pandemic and beyond.


Designing Sustainable Cities

Designing Sustainable Cities

PDF Designing Sustainable Cities Download

  • Author: Rob Roggema
  • Publisher: Springer Nature
  • ISBN: 3030546861
  • Category : Science
  • Languages : en
  • Pages : 207

This book emphasizes new ways of designing for a sustainable city and urban environment. From several angles the future of our urbanism is illuminated. From a philosophical point of view, the city is seen as an organism, following complex ecosystemic principles, shining light on indigenous perspectives to become beneficial for sustainable design and core questions are asked whether current architectural practice is really sustainable. Simultaneously concrete practices are presented for cities in transformation, focusing on green infrastructure, smart city principles and health.